Of Gods, Watchmakers, and Unicorns (Part 4)

God Is Not A Unicorn Series

Part 1 looked at the reason why the question of God ‘s existence cannot be satisfied by an appeal to the imagination alone.

Part 2 looked at the different approaches to the question of creation by Philosophy, Religion, and Science.

Part 3 looked at some of the scientific weaknesses of The Big Bang Theory, our modern Creation Myth

Part 4, below, is a post on the question of what do we mean when we talk about God. Secondly, can science address the question of existence and being?


This series began by explaining why the question about the existence of God is not the same type of question as the questions posed by imaginary things like a unicorn. It is time to return to the beginning in order to address how we got to this point in our culture that we think they are the same kind of question.

When we talk about God today, we are rarely talking about the God of antiquity, but more like a modern version of a demiurge.

Continue reading “Of Gods, Watchmakers, and Unicorns (Part 4)”

The Experience of God: Being, Conscious, Bliss

What Does The Word “God” mean?

I found this book while working on my latest series of posts and thought it looked intriguing.

Despite the recent ferocious public debate about belief, the concept most central to the discussion—God—frequently remains vaguely and obscurely described. Are those engaged in these arguments even talking about the same thing? In a wide-ranging response to this confusion, esteemed scholar David Bentley Hart pursues a clarification of how the word “God” functions in the world’s great theistic faiths.

Ranging broadly across Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Vedantic and Bhaktic Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism, Hart explores how these great intellectual traditions treat humanity’s knowledge of the divine mysteries. Constructing his argument around three principal metaphysical “moments”—being, consciousness, and bliss—the author demonstrates an essential continuity between our fundamental experience of reality and the ultimate reality to which that experience inevitably points.

Thoroughly dismissing such blatant misconceptions as the deists’ concept of God, as well as the fundamentalist view of the Bible as an objective historical record, Hart provides a welcome antidote to simplistic manifestoes. In doing so, he plumbs the depths of humanity’s experience of the world as powerful evidence for the reality of God and captures the beauty and poetry of traditional reflection upon the divine.

The Experience of God: Being, Conscious, Bliss

This looks like good reading in these anxious times. 🙂